Is Amazon Prime Wardrobe the Future of Shopping?

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Is Amazon Prime Wardrobe the future of shopping?

I seriously believe that Amazon is taking over the world, which is something I have very mixed feelings about. I love Amazon. I use my Amazon Prime account like it’s going out of style and get a huge box of goodies each month via Amazon’s Subscribe and Save program. I have a Kindle Paperwhite, Fire TV, Fire TV Stick and an Amazon Echo Dot. Amazon is going to acquire Whole Foods.

Despite my frequent Amazon usage, I can’t help but think that the spate of store closings over the past couple of years were at least indirectly caused by Amazon’s dominance. Now, the upcoming launch of Amazon Prime Wardrobe leads me to believe that there is going to be a very big change in the way people shop and will have an especially large impact on sites like StitchFix.

With Amazon Prime Wardrobe, you’ll be able to browse over a million items in Amazon Fashion and have them shipped to your door for free. So, it’s like Stitch Fix, but there’s no stylist fee and you get to choose every item you receive. Once your box arrives, you’ll have seven days to try on the items and decide what you want to keep. You only pay for what you decide to keep, and the more you keep the more you’ll save! You’ll save 10 percent if you purchase three or four items and you’ll save a whopping 20 percent if you purchase five or more items. You can also return the items you don’t want for free – they’ll include a return address label so all you need to do is stick it on the box and leave it at your doorstep.

You will be able to get clothing, shoes, and accessories for women, men, children, and babies via Amazon Prime Wardrobe.

My guess is that while many brands will be available via Amazon Prime Wardrobe, the best deals will be available for Amazon’s in-house clothing brands. Their in-house brands are Lark & Ro (women’s clothing),  Ella Moon (globally-inspired women’s clothing that’s only available for Amazon Prime members), Mae (bralettes and panties exclusively available for Amazon Prime members), Paris Sunday (women’s clothing exclusively available for Amazon Prime members), Amazon Essentials (affordable clothing basics for men and women that’s available exclusively for Amazon Prime members), Buttoned Down (dress shirts for men available exclusively for Amazon Prime members), Goodthreads (men’s clothing available exclusively for Amazon Prime members), and Scout + Ro (affordable stylish clothing for kids). All items that are eligible for this service will be tagged with a “Prime Wardrobe” label.

As much as I love Amazon, I can already see how this service could have a very negative impact on other retail outlets. Stores that are already struggling just won’t be able to keep up with clothing that ships for free, is super discounted, and can be returned for free. Companies like StitchFix may find it hard to keep up because Amazon will be that much cheaper and you’ll be able to keep trying different items for free until you find the perfect item you need. As I said on Facebook when the Whole Foods deal was announced, this is Amazon’s world and we’re just living in it. For better or worse, this company is drastically changing the retail landscape.

Currently, Amazon Prime Wardrobe is only in beta, but you can click here to get notified when the service officially launches.

It’s worth pointing out that this service will only be available for Amazon Prime members. Amazon Prime currently costs $99 per year, which I say is a steal of a deal considering everything that you get. (And also, Amazon  IS taking over the world and I’m pretty sure their goal is to make sure everyone has a Prime membership by 2020.)

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About Lisa

Lisa Koivu is the founder and editor of ShopGirlDaily.com. She also shares writing and monetization tips for bloggers at OhSheBlogs.com.